NEWS | July 8, 2020

Task Force Javelin Soldiers Awarded Combat Patch

By Story by Sgt. Trevor Cullen Task Force Spartan

21 Soldiers from Task Force Javelin were awarded their Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service in a ceremony held in the CENTCOM area of responsibility July 1.

“The basic mission [of Task Force Javelin] is to provide rotary-wing support to Task Force Spartan and U.S. Army Central,” said Lt. Col. Paul Fowler, the Commander of Task Force Javelin. “We cover general lift missions to medical evacuations, providing logistical moving of persons and equipment.”

Task Force Javelin consists of elements of the 1-189th General Support Aviation Battalion assigned to areas throughout the CENTCOM area of responsibility. Some of these areas have been designated combat zones.

As a result of this classification, Soldiers serving in these areas are authorized to wear the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service, also known as a combat patch, for the unit they are assigned. For the Soldiers assigned to the 1-189th, that means the patch of the 34th “Red Bulls” Infantry Division.

“A lot of history and tradition that goes with the Red Bulls,” said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Russell Reinemer, a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter pilot, assigned to the 1-189th GSAB who was awarded the SSI. “It’s just a privilege to get that today.”

The combat patch is worn on the right shoulder of the Army Combat Uniform and can be worn there for the remainder of the Service Member’s career.

“This patch is something that they will have for the rest of their lives,” said 1st Sgt. Bradley Hutchison, the GSAB’s Headquarters and Headquarters Company first sergeant. “It is awesome for the Soldiers to receive this and keep it forever.”

“It’s seeing history in the making,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Frederick Haerter, the Senior Enlisted Leader of Task Force Javelin. “It’s Task Force Javelin’s mission to fix and fly helicopters and these Soldiers are the tip of the spear.”

The Soldiers of the 1-189th GSAB will continue to serve in the Middle East until they return to their home station in Helena, Montana.

“I was already proud of them,” said Hutchison. “They are getting the recognition they deserve.”

“It’s an honor to serve with them,” said Fowler.